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Jing is free software that adds visuals to your online conversations

Jing by Techsmith, is a tool that has captured my attention. It is a simple to use tool for instant sharing. It can be used for screen shots, videos, call outs and to show people what you are seeing on your screen with a click of a button with a linking URL.  Much better than the process of screen shot, save to word ect.  It sits on your desk top as a yellow half-moon ready for when you want to screen shot with three choices of capture, history and more.

Their website says it is to add visuals to your online conversation. There is a free version and a paid version for adding video. With the free version you also get 2 mg on Screencast which is a nice benefit.

Here is a few ways they suggest using Jing

  • collaborateCollaborate on a design project
  • share snapshotShare a snapshot of a document
  • speechNarrate your vacation photos
  • bugCapture that pesky bug in action
  • family tech supportShow Dad how to use iTunes
  • homeworkComment verbally on students’ homework
  • tidbitsPost tidbits from your life on Twitter or Facebook

What I also like is that is integrated with their other programs, that are more complex.

Screencast.com Screencast.  It not only provides free storage and instant sharing of your Jing content…it’s also a super place to share your high-quality videos, images, presentations, and all manner of digital content.

 

Snagit Snag-It . This Swiss-army knife of screen capture picks up where Jing leaves off.  Powerful image editing, scrolling window capture, cursor capture, tagging, search, and rugged good looks.

Camtasia Studio Camtasia Studio.  Jing’s big brother on the video side—and the ideal choice for creating longer, more polished screen videos. Camtasia Studio can edit your Jing videos, too.

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LinkedIn Strategy for how you connect. Lion, Turtle, HoundDog or Alley Cat.

Have you ever wondered why some people put [LION] after their name on LinkedIn?  Most CMOs are still trying to avoid LinkedIn except for people they know or want to know.  For others, there are strategies to how, what and why.  For myself, found out  I am more of an Alley Cat.  I like to connect, do it often, but want and need a connection as to why I have the contact. I do turn people down that I do not know.   So let’s try an experiment,  here is my linked in http://www.linkedin.com/in/karenkallet.  If you tell me that you came via this CMO Guide to Social Media blog, I will accept you.  However, tell me why you want the connection.  That is the Alley Cat in me.

 This blog from Community Marketing Blog lays out the why and what.  You need to decide which one are you and know if you see a tag on their name this is what it is meaning.

 Are You a LION, Turtle, HoundDog, or Alley Cat? What’s Your LinkedIn Strategy?

LI in Oz2
 LinkedIn is a fairly harmonious place.  People tend to act professional and when there are opposing opinions they typically become a case where people “agree to disagree”.  Things change though when you began discussing LIONS.  Suddenly the conversation isn’t so rosy.  

LION’s, for those who don’t know are open networkers.  They connect to just about anyone.  They see opportunity increasing as the number of connections increases.  Those who disagree see LIONS as simply driving their ego’s by counting the connections, as if the purpose of LinkedIn is to proudly claim to have 1,000’s of connections.

For the record I don’t consider myself a LION, yet I’m an open networker.  When writing my first LinkedIn book I identified three LinkedIn connection strategies.  This year I added a fourth to define how I now connect.

How you choose to connect will impact how you use LinkedIn and in the end your chances of finding success.

Before we look at the four connection strategies I want to make one point.  How you choose to connect on LinkedIn should be of no concern to anyone else.  It’s your network and your strategy.  As long as it works for you thats all that matters.

The Four LinkedIn Connection Strategies:

The LION
As stated above LIONS are completely open connectors.  They seek to increase their connections through actively sending out and accepting connection invitations.  While I’m sure there are a few who take pride in touting the specific number, the majority simply believe that large networks lead to more opportunity.

Steve Burda is a LION with over 30,000 connections.  I don’t know Steve but I’ve seen countless references to his taking time to help others.  So yes he has a large network, but no its not about the number.  Its about having the opportunity to help a significant number of people.  If this leads to new business for him, more power to him.

The Turtle
Turtles are the opposite of LIONS.  Turtles primarily only connect to those they know well.  They see value in having a tight network made up of individuals that they completely trust.  Their networks tend to be highly selective and can be counted on to pass on introductions, much like a private networking group.

I don’t know many Turtles but the ones I do know are like Steve interested in being a productive resource for those they choose to connect to.  LinkedIn is a way to enhance their offline networking making their existing relationships a little more connected.

The Hound Dog
When I first joined LinkedIn I was only aware of LIONS.  I knew right away that LinkedIn added an additional layer of connectivity to those I knew.  I also realized that it could help me meet other local business professionals that I did not know.

At each Chamber meeting they would pass out copies of everyone’s business cards.  After each meeting I would see who was on LinkedIn and then invite them to connect.  At the next Chamber meeting the connection provided a great ice breaker.  It also established connections with those people who only attended a single meeting.

I also used LinkedIn to seek out people I would like to connect with.  Doing this allowed me to establish connections with other business professionals who might help my clients, become a referral partner, and some who were prospects.  This ability to hunt for specific people led me to define the strategy as a Hound Dog.

A Hound Dog is someone who uses LinkedIn to connect to those they know, to connect to those they would like to know, and accepts invitations from those that would be beneficial to be connected to.  

For the first year that I was serious about using LinkedIn I followed this strategy.  Then one day I had a thought, “How do I know whether or not a connection I know could benefit from a connection that I didn’t know?”   The answer was that I didn’t know.

It was that at this point that I changed my strategy for connecting on LinkedIn. 

The Alley Cat
I still only send invitations to people I know or people that I have a specific reason for connecting to.  What changed is that I now accept invitations from just about anyone.  There is value in knowing your connections but there are also unexpected opportunities that develop from establishing new connections, known and unknown.

This connection strategy supports my overall LinkedIn strategy which is this:  I seek to provide value to and help as many people as possible.  Much of that value is provided through the Social Media Sonar blog, sharing tips and strategies with others on how to more effectively utilize LinkedIn and social media/networking.  Sometimes its through being the hub to connect two people.  At other times its through conducting workshops, writing LinkedIn books and guides, etc.  The more people I am connected to the more people that I can share with.

I believe that to create opportunity you have to first be willing to help others.  Then, by consistently sharing value over time, you allow people to move through the Process of Familiarity.  A process that has to happen before someone will choose to do business with you.

What I call the Process of Familiarity likely has been called many things by other people.   The three components are:

  • People need to Know You or at a Minimum Know Of You:  Often connecting or engaging in conversations will accomplish this.
  • People Must Like You or Have a Positive Opinion:  How you interact with others and the value of the content you share will help here.  If people like your content they will like you.
  • People Must Trust You:  Building trust is dependent upon engaging on conversations or sharing value consistently over time.  As people see you on an ongoing basis and are exposed to the value you share the “Like” will grow into “Trust”.

Through this process here’s what I’ve seen happen.  Each week I write one or two blog posts that show people how to utilize LinkedIn.  I then use the tools LinkedIn provides to communicate that there is a new blog post.  People visit the blog for the first time or as a repeat visitor.  At some point they check out my profile and learn what it is that I do and see how I can help them.  

If they like the content they begin to have a positive impression of me and this eventually moves to a sense of trust.  At this point if they ever have a need for my services I am top of mind and they will contact me.

Something else happens as well.  People like to share content on other Social Media sites so at some point they become my social media amplification system.  This introduces my blog to people outside of the communities I’ve built.

Wrap Up
The connection strategy you choose will depend upon how you want to use LinkedIn.  There is no right or wrong choice as long as your connection strategy supports the goals you have determined.  For me the change to an Alley Cat has helped generate 3 to 5 contacts per week about my services.

Which strategy are you using and why?  If you agree or disagree with the post please leave a comment.  Your perspective is as important as mine, so share it with everyone.

Sean Nelson is the author of the Social Media Sonar blog and has written three LinkedIn eBooks including one of the first books detailing how to strategically use LinkedIn to grow your business. “LinkedIn Marketing Secret Formula”.  He is a Partner in SONARconnects.”

2010 Marketing Plans: Facebook page upgrade add to must do list.

I was reading the social mouths blog on make your Facebook page shine and  I really like the actionable items that are listed.  The full blog is at: http://socialmouths.com/blog/2009/12/16/make-your-facebook-fan-page-shine/

 Facebook is an area where we will all live work and play.  So as a CMO, it is imperative that you dig in and get to know how you can leverage this way of the future.  This blog does a great job of summing up options and directions that you can look at to add it to your must do 2010 marketing initiatives.

 His top 10 that you need to read about  from SocialMouths are:

 “1. Insights (Your In-House Analytics)

 2. Vanity URL

3. Big Profile Pic (Banner Style)

4. Invitations & Bulk Messages

5. Facebook Widgets On Your Blog

 6. Twitter Integration

7. Blog Promotion

8. FBML Landing Page

9. Facebook Ads

10. Facebook Apps”

 

Where to find the women consumers in social media.

Mashable again has a knock out recap of info from Information is Beautiful on demographics by site.  This is really valuable to CMO’s in evaluating your teams plans or the agencies next proposal.  It also says to me that if you are targeting men, Digg is one not to overlook. This also gives you a good check list to be sure you are represented on all the main social media platforms.

Here is the Link: http://mashable.com/2009/10/03/women-rule-the-social-web/

Here is a recap: “Women rule social media at least according to an infographic by Information is Beautiful. The stats, compiled by Brian Solis from Google Ad Plannerdata, show that equal numbers of men and women use sites like LinkedIn, DeviantArt and YouTube.

When it comes to sites like Flickr, Facebook, Twitter, FriendFeed, MySpace and Bebo, however, women outnumber men. In fact, there’s only one major holdout for men on the social web: social news site Digg, where 64% of users are male.

womensocialweb

Ad agency pay per tweet programs

I had an interesting  question come to the blog.   How should you pay a PR or ad agency for doing your companies tweeting?  Some have suggested a flat fee per day others are floating the idea of doing an “Ad agency pay per tweet programs.”

Both raise some interesting changes in the way social media will be used and how to monitize the actions involved with keeping it ongoing. The bigger question is how much should you as a CMO decide to keep in house and how much should you outsource?  How much control do you want or how much over site due to privacy policies or regulation do you need?   What about the tweeting across the company, should marketing be the control valve or is it really a legal, customer service or operation function?

 I look forward to your comments as to how you are compensating your agencies for tweeting.

TEI- Total Economic Impact and ROI in Social Media for Customer Service

Many of you have emailed me looking for the link to the Forrester information that I discussed at the BMA conference. Dr Natalie Petouhoff,  has done a great job of  proofing the model for customer service ROI, when it comes to social media.

 Here is her deck, that she sent to me and agreed to let me use and put on my blog.

 http://www.slideshare.net/drnatalie/dr-natalie-petouhoff-roi-of-social-media-social-media-club-presentation-forrester-research

Is your ecommerce shopping cart PCI compliant?

So you were wondering, why should I need to keep track of this PCI with all my other duties?  If you sell on-line via a shopping cart,  then you are effected by these new security rules that need to be in place by 2010.  Check to see if your IT pros are on top of this and if they are already compliant.  If you do your own shopping cart code it is subject to rigorous review.

In my research of this change, I have found that the Payment Card Industry (PCI) established these security standards to protect the private information of all individuals and organizations. These are the security standards that are used by all credit card companies and all financial institutions, Internet vendors, and on-line and retail merchants.

Ask if your shopping cart  and payment gateway is fully PCI compliant and at what level it is classified. They are rated level 1 to 4, with 1 being the highest.  This PCI standard from a marketing perspective should be promoted, since it means your customers can feel safe that their private information is kept secure and handled appropriately.

Check to see if your IT dept or web masters have been  informed that your Web site or storefront is not PCI compliant. In some cases it is likely referring to your Web site  and not to your shopping cart .  If your web site does not collect any credit card information, it does not need to be PCI compliant.  All Credit Card transactions  processed through your shopping cart must be PCI compliant.  I have read that for small retailers the cost could be around $5k.  But for larger merchants it could be $20 k to as high as $4 million to comply.

For additional information on PCI Compliance, visit the PCI Compliance Guide Web site.  There is also  a good article on the subject in Sept 09, Internet Retailer Magazine.